Political figures, voters say 2016 Presidential Election is stressful

52% of American adults say this election is a "very" or "somewhat significant" source of stress

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, right, shakes hands with Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump at the start of the presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, right, shakes hands with Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump at the start of the presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

Political figures and voters agree that most people are just worn out by the 2016 presidential election.

Some people are so stressed that the American Psychological Association is reminding people how to relieve stress during this political cycle.

In what is being termed the super bowl of elections, the race for the white house has sparked a lot of interest in politics. In fact, more than 80 million people tuned in to watch the first presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.

“There’s a lot of interest in the election this year which is a positive thing,” said Mark Glantz, assistant professor of communications and media studies at St. Norbert College.

But with only 26 days until ballots are cast, is it becoming too much?

“Yes, I am over this election,” said Bonnie Haffajee.

“It’s like election overload,” said Kevin Dickuy. “It’s just really getting tiring.”

“Pretty rough and pretty stressful,” said John Camarlo.

In a world where political news is everywhere, be it your cell phone or TV, many people said it’s hard to escape.

“You get on Facebook, it’s on Facebook, you turn on the TV, it’s there, you turn on the radio, it’s there and it’s constant overload,” said Haffajee.

“We get it everywhere and maybe that is some of our problem. Maybe this 24 hour news cycle is a problem,” said Camarlo.

Haffajee, Dickuy and Camarlo are not alone with this voter fatigue. In an annual survey by the American Psychological Association, 52 percent of American adults view this presidential election as a ‘very’ or ‘somewhat significant’ stress source.

“I completely understand and respect why somebody would get tired of all the political information coming at them in the media during this political cycle,” said Glantz.

Glantz said voting fatigue is really an American issue. He said one of the reasons is because our election season is so long.

“In Canada they have elections that are much shorter. In other countries there are laws that say you can’t run a political ad until you are within 60 days of the debate/election,” said Glantz.

Plus Glantz said it’s everywhere and it’s big business.

“Media outlets know they can generate ratings and make money based on advertising by covering the election and covering perhaps the more negative and sensational stories related to the election,” said Glantz.

Glantz said it’s unlikely to change, but he hopes all the buzz encourages more people to vote.

“The good news about people being stressed out means they are taking this decision seriously so maybe that’s a silver lining,” said Glantz.

Haffajee, Dickuy and Camarlo all say they will vote.

“It’s nothing I am excited about,” said Dickuy.

But they are looking forward to what happens after the election is over.

“We don’t have to listen to anymore ads,” said Haffajee.