Obama half-brothers disagree on attending debate

FILE - In this Jan. 17, 2016 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks about the release of Americans by Iran, in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. A $400 million cash delivery to Iran to repay a decades-old arbitration claim may be unprecedented in recent U.S. history, according to legal experts and diplomatic historians, raising further questions about a payment timed to help free four American prisoners in Iran. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
FILE - In this Jan. 17, 2016 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks about the release of Americans by Iran, in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. A $400 million cash delivery to Iran to repay a decades-old arbitration claim may be unprecedented in recent U.S. history, according to legal experts and diplomatic historians, raising further questions about a payment timed to help free four American prisoners in Iran. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the U.S. presidential campaign (all times EDT):

7:20 a.m.

President Barack Obama’s half-brother says he doesn’t agree with the decision by another half-brother to attend the final presidential debate as a guest of the Donald Trump campaign.

Mark Obama Ndesandjo said, “I love my brothers, but no one member represents the Obamas.”

The Trump campaign said Obama’s Kenyan-born half-brother Malik would be in the audience for the showdown Wednesday between Trump and Hillary Clinton.

The three men share the same father but have different mothers.

Ndesandjo is an American businessman who has lived in the southern Chinese city of Shenzhen for about 15 years.

In an email to The Associated Press, he said: “Others in my family and I do not support my brother Malik’s position on Mr. Trump.” Malik Obama supports Trump’s candidacy.

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3:25 a.m.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump’s ugly and acrimonious battle for the White House is barreling toward the end, with the candidates taking the debate stage Wednesday night for one final primetime showdown.

For Trump, the debate is perhaps his last opportunity to turn around a race that appears to be slipping away from him. His predatory comments about women and a flood of sexual assault accusations have deepened his unpopularity with women and limited his pathways to victory.

Clinton takes the stage facing challenges of her own. While the electoral map currently leans in her favor, the Democrat is facing a new round of questions about her authenticity and trustworthiness, concerns that have trailed her throughout the campaign.