FBI: SC serial killer was prohibited from buying guns

Todd Kohlhepp is escorted into a Spartanburg County magistrate courtroom, Friday, Nov. 4, 2016, in Spartanburg, S.C.. Kohlhepp, a 45-year-old registered sex offender with a previous kidnapping conviction, appeared at a bond hearing Friday on a kidnapping charge in connection to a woman being found chained inside a storage container on a property in Woodruff, S.C. More charges will be filed later, the prosecutor told the court. (Tim Kimzey/The Spartanburg Herald-Journal via AP)
Todd Kohlhepp is escorted into a Spartanburg County magistrate courtroom, Friday, Nov. 4, 2016, in Spartanburg, S.C.. Kohlhepp, a 45-year-old registered sex offender with a previous kidnapping conviction, appeared at a bond hearing Friday on a kidnapping charge in connection to a woman being found chained inside a storage container on a property in Woodruff, S.C. More charges will be filed later, the prosecutor told the court. (Tim Kimzey/The Spartanburg Herald-Journal via AP)

WOODRUFF, S.C. (WSPA) – The FBI says that Todd Kohlhepp would have been prohibited from buying guns.

They say their records show he never tried to buy one legally.

Investigators found guns on the property in Woodruff, S.C. They say there was an assault rifle and two guns. There were five guns at his home.

He could have bought them from private sellers, straw sales, or even individual sellers at gun shows.

The ATF says their job in this case will be to trace every firearm he had on this property. They have not been called in to do that yet.

Kohlhepp was arrested last week, when investigators searching the property discovered Kala Brown — a woman alive and chained in a large storage container — yelling for help. The body of Charles Carver, Brown’s boyfriend, was later found in a shallow grave on the land. That couple had disappeared about two months earlier.

Kala Brown and Charles Carver
Kala Brown and Charles Carver

After his arrest, deputies say Kohlhepp confessed to killing four other people in the county at a motorcycle shop in 2003. He confessed to the cold case after they granted him several requests, including letting him speak to his mother. He also led authorities Saturday to the graves on his property.

A coroner says two bodies that were found on the property were a couple who had been buried there for about a year.

Coroner Rusty Clevenger said Wednesday that one of the victims was a 25-year-old woman who appears to have died from a gunshot wound to the head and the other was her husband, a 29-year-old man who had a gunshot wound to his torso.

TODD KOHLHEPP’S BACKGROUND

Court records from Arizona reveal that Kohlhepp has been convicted of kidnapping in the past.

Kohlhepp pleaded guilty to the kidnapping and was sentenced to 15 years in prison.

According to court records, Kohlhepp kidnapped and sexually assaulted a 14-year-old girl when he was 15 years old.

He was living with his biological father in Tempe, Ariz. at the time of the kidnapping.

According to court documents, Kohlhepp forced the girl into his home and tied her hands and put tape over her mouth and sexually assaulted her.

In his ruling a judge stated of Kohlhepp, “at the age of 9, he was ‘explosive’ and ‘preoccupied with sexual content.’ He has not changed. He has been unabatedly aggressive to others and destructive of property since nursery school.”

He went on to say, “Twenty-five months of the most intensive and expensive professional intervention, short of God’s, will provide no protection for the public and no rehabilitation of this juvenile.”

Kohlhepp also had extensive counseling, including hospitalization, for his behavior in Georgia, court records say.

The court documents also include a psychiatric evaluation that say Kohlhepp destroyed his room with a hammer, destroyed other children’s projects, cloroxed a goldfish, shot a dog with a BB gun, was dismissed from the Boy Scouts because he was too disruptive, and shredded his own new clothes. The report also says his father made a statement saying the only emotion Kohlhepp was capable of was anger.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.